Authors

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There are currently 49 names in this directory
ANDRUSYAK Jaroslav
is a lecturer at Uzhhorod National University. His research interests are the Middle Ages, the history of the Late Middle Czech especially the formation and the development of the estate representative monarchy in the Czech Kingdom during the reign of the Jagiellonian dynasty (1471-1526). He is the author of 12 scientific articles concerned with Czech Kingdom under the rule of the Jagiellonian dynasty. Research interests: foreign and domestic policies of the Jagiellonians, the functions of the estate representative authorities, religious relations in the Czech Kingdom, diplomatic and dynastic politics of the Jagiellons.
E-mail: -

CASH Jennifer R.
holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from the Indiana University, USA. She is currently an Associate of the Max Planck Institute of Social Anthropology. Jennifer Cash is conducting ethnographic research in Moldova since 1999 on a variety of themes: ethnicity and nationalism, cultural politics, and – more recently – the relations between Moldova's economic transition and religious revival. She authored a book: Village on Stage. Folklore and Nationalism in the Republic of Moldova, LIT Verlag, Berlin, 2011.
E-mail: cashjennifer10@gmail.com

CAȘU Igor
is Lecturer and Director of the Center for the Study of Totalitarianism at the Faculty of History and Philosophy, State University of Moldova, Chisinau. He received his Ph.D. in History from Jassy University in Romania in March 2000 and was Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at Lenoir University, NC, in 2000, and at Stanford University and Hoover Institution, in 2016. In 2010 he served as vice chairman of the Presidential Commission for the Study and Evaluation of the Communist Totalitarian Regime in the Republic of Moldova. Among his research interests are Soviet Nationalities Policy and Political Repressions, Violence and Resistance in Soviet Moldavia during Stalinism and after 1953. Among his recent publications are “The Fate of Stalinist Victims in Soviet Moldavia after 1953: Amnesty, Pardon and the Long Road to Rehabilitation”, in Kevin McDermott, Matthew Stibbe, eds., De-Stalinising Eastern Europe. The Rehabilitation of Stalin’s Victims, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 and The Class Enemy. Political Repressions, Violence and Resistance in Moldavian (A)SSR, 1924-1956, Chișinău: Cartier, 2015, 388 pp., with an introduction by Vladimir Tismaneanu (in Romanian).
E-mail: igorcasu@gmail.com

CEPAITIENE Rasa
is a researcher at the Lithuanian Historical Institute, Associate Professor at Vilnius University, and lecturer at the European Humanities University. Her scholarly interests are cultural heritage conservation theories, world and Lithuanian historiographies, cultural (especially post-communist) memory studies. She has authored 4 monographs, including her last work “Cultural heritage in the global world” (2010, Russian and Lithuanian versions) and about 60 research papers. Research interests: cultural heritage and collective memory studies, Soviet culture and post-Soviet transformation.
E-mail: rasa.cepaitiene@if.vu.lt

CIMPOEŞU Dorin
is a historian, former secretary of the Romanian diplomatic mission in Moldova and Armenia, currently a professor at the Department of Archives of the “Al. I. Cuza” Academy in Bucharest. He published several books and articles on political changes in the Republic of Moldova.
E-mail: dorin.cimpoesu@dhmprint.ro

COADĂ Ludmila
is Associate Professor at Free International University of Moldova and Researcher at the Institute of History and Political Science. She has conducted research as a Fulbright Scholar at George Washington University (2010-2011). Her areas of interest include Moldova’s foreign policy, Moldova’s relations with Russia and the EU, and Russia’s politics towards the post-soviet states. She is the author of Zemstvo Institution in Bessarabia: Historical and Juridical Aspects (Chisinau, 2009) and has published various scholarly articles on Bessarabian history and Moldovan politics.
E-mail: l_coada@yahoo.com

CULICIU Cristian
graduated from the Faculty of International Relations, Political Science and Communication Sciences, University of Oradea. He holds an MA in the History of the Romanian West. He is currently an editor at Ratio and Revelatio Publishing House.
E-mail: cristian.culiciu@yahoo.com

CURTA Florin
is professor of Medieval History and Archaeology at the University of Florida. His books include The Making of the Slavs: History and Archaeology of the Lower Danube, ca. 500-700 (Cambridge, 2011), which has received the Herbert Baxter Adams Award of the American Historical Association; Southeastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 500-1250 (Cambridge 2006); and the Edinburgh History of the Greeks, c. 500 to 1050. The Early Middle Ages (Edinburgh, 2011). Curta is the editor of five collections of studies, and the editor-in-chief of the Brill series “East Central and eastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 450-1450.”
E-mail: fcurta@ufl.edu

CUȘCO Andrei
(b. 1982, Chișinău, Republic of Moldova) holds a Ph.D. degree in the Comparative History of Central, Southeastern and Eastern Europe from the Department of History of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest. His research interests focus on modern East European history, comparative history of the Eurasian empires, intellectual history and historiography. Starting from September 2008, he is a lecturer at the Department of World History of Ion Creangă Pedagogical State University in Chișinău. Since 2011, Dr. Cușco has been Director of the Center for Empire Studies at the Department of History and Philosophy within Moldova State University. Dr. Cușco’s most recent major publication is a book on the history of Bessarabia as a borderland of the Russian Empire (Bessarabia as a Part of the Russian Empire, 1812-1917), published, in Russian, at the Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie Press (Moscow) in March 2012, co-authored with Victor Taki.
E-mail: andreicusco@yahoo.com

DEVYATKOV Andrey
is a researcher in the area of International Relations, candidate of science (Russian equivalent of Ph.D.) and a research fellow at the Laboratory for Historical Geography and Regionalistics of the Tyumen State University. In 2012-2014 he was a visiting fellow and post-doc researcher in the New Europe College (Romania), Center for EU-Russian studies of the Tartu University (Estonia) and Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (Germany). He is an author of more than 40 publications on the issues like German Eastern policy, Transnistrian conflict settlement, Russian, Moldovan and Romanian foreign policy. One of his key publications is a monograph Challenged by Europeanization: Russian policy in the Transnistrian conflict settlement (1992-2012).
E-mail: devyatkovav@gmail.com

DUMITRU Diana
is an Associate Professor of History at Ion Creangă Pedagogical State University of Moldova. Her first book on Great Britain’s role in the union of the Romanian Principalities was published in 2010, and she is currently finishing a book on the relationship between Jews and Gentiles in the Soviet Union and Romania between 1918 and 1945. Her articles have been published in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Cahiers du monde russe, and Yad Vashem Studies, among others. Her World Politics article, "Constructing Interethnic Conflict and Cooperation: Why Some People Harmed Jews and Others Helped Them during the Holocaust in Romania" received the 2012 Mary Parker Follett Award for the best article or chapter published in the field of politics and history.
E-mail: dumitrudi@gmail.com

DZYADEVYCH Tetyana
is a Ph.D. student at the University of Illinois in Chicago, Department of Slavic and Baltic Languages and Literatures. Previously she taught at The National University “Kyiv Mohila Academy” in Kiev, Ukraine (2005-2012).
E-mail: tdzyad2@uic.edu

FEDUNYAK Sergiy G.
is Professor of International Relations at Chernivtsi National University. He has conducted his research at the Kennan Institute (2010-2011), where he studied the basic parameters and principal factors forming US-European joint security policy in the Newly Independent States of Europe and Eurasia region. He has published European security dimensions on the post-soviet space: Formation of integrated security system of West and the Newly Independent States (Chernivtsi, 2005), as well as numerous articles on democratization, European integration and security, and Ukraine’s foreign policy.
E-mail: sfedunyak@yahoo.com

FELCHER Anastasia
is a PhD candidate in Management and Development of Cultural Heritage at IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca, a graduate from PhD program at the Academy of Sciences of Moldova, and a Central European University History Department alumna. She has written on the intellectual construction of Russian literary pantheon in 19th and 20th centuries and is currently working on the topic of (mis)management of Jewish built heritage in the urban environment of Eastern Europe. Her academic interests include: Russian and East-Central European studies, the intersection of literature and politics, the politics of commemoration, cultural heritage studies and protection, etc.
E-mail: anastasia.felcher@gmail.com

FUKUYAMA Francis
is the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) and the Mosbacher Director of FSI's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL). He is also a professor by courtesy in the Department of Political Science. He was previously at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University, where he was the Bernard L. Schwartz Professor of International Political Economy and director of SAIS' International Development program. Dr. Fukuyama has written widely on issues relating to questions concerning democratization and international political economy. His book, The End of History and the Last Man, was published by Free Press in 1992 and has appeared in over twenty foreign editions. His most recent book is Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy. Francis Fukuyama received his B.A. from Cornell University in classics, and his Ph.D. from Harvard in Political Science. He was a member of the Political Science Department of the RAND Corporation, and twice member of the Policy Planning Staff of the US Department of State. From 1996-2000 he was Omer L. and Nancy Hirst Professor of Public Policy at the School of Public Policy at George Mason University. He served as a member of the President's Council on Bioethics from 2001-2004. Dr. Fukuyama is chairman of the editorial board of The American Interest, which he helped to found in 2005. He holds honorary doctorates from Connecticut College, Doane College, Doshisha University (Japan), and Kansai University (Japan). He is a member of the Board of Governors of the Pardee Rand Graduate School, and of the Volcker Alliance. He is a member of the American Political Science Association and the Council on Foreign Relations. He is married to Laura Holmgren and has three children.
E-mail: ffukuyam@stanford.edu

GOINA Mariana
is a AFP lecturer at the World History Department, Pedagogical University, Chisinau. Her scholarly interests are medieval literacy, social and cultural history. She authored several articles, and her book on Moldavian and Wallachian Transition from Oral Culture to the Written Word is forthcoming at Brepols Publishers.
E-mail: mariana.goina@gmail.com

GROM Oleg
is a PhD candidate at the European University at Saint Petersburg. The topic of his thesis is The Bessarabian question and Moldavian nationalism in the early XX century. Author of several papers on nationalism in Bessarabia, co-author of the volume Bessarabia v sostave Rossiiskoi imperii, 1812-1917 (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2012) with Andrei Cușco and Viktor Taki. Author and editor of a Russian language site on the history of Moldova and Romania (http://dacoromania.net). Research interests: modern Bessarabia and Romania, national movements in Eastern Europe and the Russian Empire, the borderlands of the Russian Empire, ethno-confessional policy in the region.
E-mail: gromescu@gmail.com

HUSEYNOVA Sevil
PhD student at the Institute of European Ethnology, Humboldt University in Berlin. In 2007-2010 she was the representative of the Heinrich Böll Foundation in Azerbaijan and in 2010-2012 worked as Country Director of the Imagine Center for Conflict Transformation. Her main research interests include urban anthropology; ethnicity; diasporic studies, transnationalism and trans-local communities. She co-authored the book “Beyond the Karabakh Conflict: The Story of Village Exchange” and has authored many academic articles.
E-mail: gsnovator@gmail.com

IHRIG Stefan
is a German historian and professor at the University of Haifa. His major publications include Atatürk in the Nazi Imagination (Harvard University Press, 2014), Justifying Genocide – Germany and the Armenians from Bismarck to Hitler (Harvard University Press, 2016), as well as his book on nationalism, national identity and history in Post-Soviet Moldova (in German, Wer sind die Moldawier?, Ibidem Press, 2008).
E-mail: stefani@vanleer.org.il

JOHNSON Carter
is the Regional Director of Russia and Moldova at American Councils for International Education and a Visiting Professor at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. His scholarly interests include the study of civil wars, post-war state-building, and the role of ethnic identity in conflict. His work has been published in International Security, World Politics, and Nationalism and Ethnic Politics.
E-mail: johnsoncarter@gmail.com

KOULINKA Natalia
is a founder and editor of the online publication “The Post-Soviet Post” at Stanford’s Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Linguistics from Belarusian State University. She was a co-founder and the editor-in-chief of the first independent feminist newspaper “The Women’s Newspaper” in Belarus. Her research interests include gender and mass media, the history and theory of the Soviet school of journalism, and political communication. She is the author of several articles on these topics.
E-mail: nkulinka@gmail.com

MADGEARU Alexandru
is senior researcher at the Institute for Political Studies of Defence and Military History, Bucharest, Romania. He received the PhD in 1997 at the University of Bucharest, and a Fulbright post-doctoral scholarship at Ohio State University (2002-2003). Besides military history, his expertise includes late ancient and medieval history and archaeology of Romania and South-Eastern Europe. His recent publications are: Asăneştii. Istoria politico-militară a statului dinastiei Asan (1185-1280), Cetatea de Scaun, Târgovişte, 2014; Byzantine Military Organization on the Danube, 10th-12th Centuries, Brill, Leiden, Boston, 2013; Împăratul Galerius, Cetatea de Scaun, Târgovişte, 2012; Istoria militară a Daciei post-romane, 275-614, Cetatea de Scaun, Târgovişte, 2011.
E-mail: amadgearu@gmail.com

MAKARYCHEV Andrey S.
is Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Fellow in the Institute for East European Studies, Free University of Berlin. He is the author of the book Russia and International Society: Conceptual Models and Policy Strategies (Lambert Publishers, 2011) and numerous articles in journals including International Spectator, Europe-Asia Studies, Journal of International Relations and Development, and Cooperation and Conflict. He has lectured in the Universities of Nizhny Novgorod and Syktyvkar (Russia), Malmo (Sweden), Azerbaijan Diplomatic Academy, and other institutions.
E-mail: asmakarychev@gmail.com

MANOLI Panagiota
(Ph.D., University of Warwick) is a lecturer at the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean, Greece. She was a Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington D.C.; Director of Studies and Research at the International Center for Black Sea Studies, Athens; and Secretary of the Economic Affairs Committee of the Parliamentary Assembly of Black Sea Economic Cooperation, Istanbul. She is the author of The dynamics of Black Sea subregionalism (2012).
E-mail: manoli@rhodes.aegean.gr

MARUTYAN Harutyun
is holding a Ph.D. degree in History and is currently Leading Researcher at the Institute of Archeology and Ethnography of National Academy of Sciences of Armenia.
E-mail: harutyanmarutyan@gmail.com

MISCHEVCA Vlad
is an Associate Professor & Ph.D. at Institute of History, Academy of Sciences of Moldova. Over a decade (2000-2010) worked in Greece, in Athens obtaining research grants. As editor of the first newspaper in Romanian in Greece, he worked for the weekly "Courier of Athens" (2002-2003), later the "Week" („Săptămâna”, 2005). Within the European program ENTER was employed as a researcher at the Institute for Neohellenic Research / F.N.R.S. in Athens (KNE). Author of 12 books and a wafer of poetry, published in Chisinau, Iasi, Athens and Thessaloniki. Key area of research is the period of transition from the medieval to the modern: the history of international relations in Southeast Europe (18th century – early 19th century), Phanariotes genealogy, heraldry, Romanian-Greek relations.
E-mail: miskewka@yahoo.fr

MUNTEANU Octavian
is an Associate Professor at the World History Department of Ion Creangă Pedagogical State University of Moldova. He is responsible for the courses of Archaeology and Ancient History of Rome and Greece. His major scientific interests are determined by the Latene era issues in the East-European territories, and mainly the history of the Getae and of their relations with the neighboring populations and with those having migrated to the Carpatho-Dniestrian silvosteppe at the end of the Ist millennium B.C.
E-mail: ocmunteanu@gmail.com

MUSTEAŢĂ Sergiu
is currently Professor ate the History and Geography Department, Ion Creangă Pedagogical State University in Chișinău. Author of 7 monographs and more than 200 articles on history, archaeology, cultural heritage preservation and textbooks analysis. The most recent work is About Us and Our Neighbours: History Textbooks in the Republic of Moldova, Romania and Ukraine. Georg Eckert Institute, Braunschweig, Eckert. Dossiers 7, 2017. urn:nbn:de:0220-2017-0097, URI: http://repository.gei.de/handle/11428/213. He is editor of two monograph series – ANTIM monographs and Unknown Documents and Histories (25 volumes published), and editor of the young historian’s annual journal (14 volumes published). Every year he does over 20 presentations and public lectures in various academic centres around the world. Hence, in recent years he has been a visiting scholar and a visiting professor in many universities of USA, Germany, Romania, etc.
E-mail: sergiu_musteata@yahoo.com

NAIMARK Norman M.
is the Robert and Florence McDonnell Professor of East European Studies, a Professor of History and (by courtesy) of German Studies, and Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution and (by courtesy) of the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies. Norman formerly served as the Sakurako and William Fisher Family Director of the Stanford Global Studies Division, the Burke Family Director of the Bing Overseas Studies Program, the Convener of the European Forum (predecessor to The Europe Center), Chair of the History Department, and the Director of Stanford’s Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Norman earned his Ph.D. in History from Stanford University in 1972 and before returning to join the faculty in 1988, he was a professor of history at Boston University and a fellow of the Russian Research Center at Harvard. He also held the visiting Catherine Wasserman Davis Chair of Slavic Studies at Wellesley College. He has been awarded the Officer's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (1996), the Richard W. Lyman Award for outstanding faculty volunteer service (1995), and the Dean's Teaching Award from Stanford University for 1991-92 and 2002-3. Norman is interested in modern Eastern European and Russian history and his research focuses on Soviet policies and actions in Europe after World War II and on genocide and ethnic cleansing in the twentieth century. His published monographs on these topics include The History of the "Proletariat": The Emergence of Marxism in the Kingdom of Poland, 1870–1887 (1979, Columbia University Press), Terrorists and Social Democrats: The Russian Revolutionary Movement under Alexander III (1983, Harvard University Press), The Russians in Germany: The History of The Soviet Zone of Occupation, 1945–1949 (1995, Harvard University Press), The Establishment of Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe (1998, Westview Press), Fires of Hatred: Ethnic Cleansing In 20th Century Europe (2001, Harvard University Press), and Stalin's Genocides (2010, Princeton University Press). Moreover, he is the author and editor of numerous additional articles, books, and chapters. In his latest book, Genocide: A World History (2016, Oxford University Press), Norman builds upon his earlier work by presenting the entire history of genocide in a single comprehensive but concise volume. The book examines numerous genocides that occurred between those in ancient civilizations and the post-Cold War genocides in the Balkans and Darfur including the warrior genocides such as during the expansion of the Mongolian empire, communist genocides such as those under Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot, and anti-communist genocides as occurred during the Guatemalan civil war. This book contributes to the literature not only by providing a single, complete presentation of the history of genocide but also by its inclusion of social and political groups as subjects of mass extermination. In so doing, Norman is able to identify additional episodes of genocide throughout history, thereby facilitating a better understanding of how mass murder has been used as a political tool and how it has developed over time. Having completed Genocide: A World History, Norman is turning his attention to his other major research stream: the pos-twar history of Europe and, in particular, the period from the end of WWII to 1948/49. He is currently working on a book manuscript that builds upon earlier work in which he examines what happens after war and genocide.
E-mail: naimark@stanford.edu

NEGURĂ Petru
is a lecturer at Ion Creangă Pedagogical State University of Moldova. He holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris) and he authored a book (Ni héros, ni traîtres. Les écrivains moldaves face au pouvoir soviétique sous Staline, Paris, L’Harmattan, 2009) and tens of academic articles. Petru Negură was an invited scholar / lecturer at the École Doctorale en Sciences Sociales of Bucharest (EDSS, within the University of Bucharest), at the École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales of Paris (EHESS), and at the University of California, Berkeley. From 2010 to 2013, Petru Negură was country coordinator of the Academic Fellowship Program (Open Society Foundations / HESP) in Moldova. From 2011, he is director of the PLURAL Forum in Social Sciences, based in Chișinău. His current research topics include: the sociology / social history of intellectuals in Eastern Europe and in the former USSR; the sociology / social history of public education in Eastern Europe and in the former Soviet Union; the sociology / social history of the social welfare services in the USSR and in post-Soviet Moldova.
E-mail: petru.negura@gmail.com

OBERLÄNDER-TÂRNOVEANU Irina
is a heritage consultant at the National Heritage Institute (INP) in Bucharest. An archaeologist and former Deputy Director of the Institute for Cultural Memory–CIMEC (1993-2011), she has worked for the national cultural heritage inventories for the last 30 years, being among the pioneers of computerization in the field of cultural heritage, archaeology and museum collections. She participated in many international, European, regional and national projects, conferences and working groups on topics regarding databases, digitization and the use of new information and communication technologies in the field of cultural heritage, aerial archaeology, access to cultural heritage, European heritage networks, policies, standards and thesauri. She published five books, and 45 papers and handbooks, edited several volumes and CD-ROMs, and developed the main website for the Romanian cultural heritage (www.cimec.ro), while also being active in international organization (ICOM/CIDOC, EAA, CAA, AARG).
E-mail: irina@cimec.ro

ONOFREI Irina
is a young historian from the Republic of Moldova. In 2015, she received her MA degree in comparative history from the Ion Creangă State Pedagogical University of Moldova. Her specific research interests are: Soviet history, social history in Eastern Europe, linguistic and cultural history.
E-mail: irina.onofrei7@gmail.com

RUMYANCEV Sergey
is very well known as one of successful Azerbaijan sociologist who is going to defend his second dissertation in history under Institute for European Ethnology, Humboldt University in Berlin. During last decade Sergey Rumyancev was involved in the research projects of changes in Azerbaijan post-independence period, studying nationalism, identity and diaspora transformation after collapse of URSS and published more than 40 studies (books, chapters and articles).
E-mail: sergnovator@yandex.ru

SAMUELSON Amy
has a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology. She is currently doing research and consulting work for environmental NGOs in Chișinău, Moldova. Her research focuses on environmental activism in Moldova and Romania, and she has presented the results of her work at the annual meetings of the American Anthropological Association, the American Ethnological Society, the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology, and the Society for Applied Anthropology.
E-mail: samuelson.amy@gmail.com

SANDLE Mark
is Associate Professor at the King’s University College, Edmonton, Canada. His main publications include A Short History of Soviet Socialism (London: UCL Press, 1999) and Brezhnev Reconsidered (edited with E. Bacon, Palgrave, 2002).
E-mail: mark.sandle@kingsu.ca

SATO Keiji
is a research fellow at the Slavic Research Centre of Hokkaido University. He is a PhD in social-cultural studies (Kyushu University), wrote his dissertation on analysis of ethnic mobilization at the end of Soviet period. He currently works as a visiting research fellow at the Davis Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies of Harvard University (June 2011 – March 2012). His recent publications are “The Analysis of the ‘Matrioshka’ Structure of Ethnic Problems during the Decline of the Soviet Era: The Case Study of the Problem of Polish-Lithuanians (in Japanese), Slavic Studies 54 (2007); “Mobilization of Non-titular Ethnicities during the Last Years of the Soviet Union: Gagauzia, Transnistria, and the Lithuanian Poles,” Acta Slavica Iaponica, Volume 26 (2009); “The Molotov-Ribbentrop Commission and Claims of Post-Soviet Secessionist Territories to Sovereignty,” Demokratizathiya, Volume 18, Number 2 (2010).
E-mail: katurazawa@gmail.com

SAVA Igor
is a Ph.D. in History, Associate Professor at the Department of World History, Ion Creangă Pedagogical State University of Chișinău; taught courses: Medieval and Early Modern World History (Western Europe), History of the Caliphate (sec. VII-XIII). Research internships and participation in various local, national and international conferences. Author of several academic studies and articles and a monograph: The country monasteries in Moldova in the second half of 14-16 centuries, Pontos, Chișinău, 2012, 332 p. Areas of interest and academic concerns: medieval history, Romanian medieval institutions, ecclesiastical, social and economic structures of Carpathian-Dniester region, medieval life and mentalities, political ideology and forms of power in the Middle Ages.
E-mail: igorsavaas@yahoo.com

SAVA Lucia
is a Ph.D. in History, Associate Professor at the Department of World History, Ion Creangă Pedagogical State University of Chișinău; taught courses: The modern history of Europe and America, The history of private life in the modern period. Internships and research projects with national and international impact in Romania, France, Poland, etc. Author of several academic studies and articles and a monograph: Daily life in Chișinău at the beginning of the twentieth century (1900-1918), Pontos, Chișinău, 2010, 318 p. Research interests: modern and contemporary history, history and culture theory, history of religions, anthropology.
E-mail: luciasmd@yahoo.com

SEREBRIAN Oleg
is a Moldovan politician, writer diplomat and political scientist, born on July 13, 1969 in Briceni, Republic of Moldova. He studied law and history at the "Ion Creangă" State Pedagogical University in Chisinau (1987 – 1992) and international relations at the European Institute in Nice, France (1992 - 1993). Serebrian entered the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Moldova in 1993. In 1998 he was awarded his doctorate in political sciences at Moldovan Academy of Sciences. In 1998-1999 he served as spokesperson of Moldova's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Between 1999 and 2005, he was Deputy Rector of the Free University of Moldova. Between 2001 and 2008 Serebrian was Chairman of the Social Liberal Party. After merging of Social Liberal Party with Democratic Party of Moldova (2008) he was elected First Deputy Chairman of DPM. Between March 2005 and July 2010 he was Member of the Parliament of Moldova. From July 2010 till July 2015 he has been Ambassador of Moldova to France. Since November 2015 he is Moldovan Ambassador to France. Oleg Serebrian is the author of several books on international affairs and geopolitics - Geopolitica spaţiului pontic (Geopolitics of the Black Sea Region, 1998), Politosfera (Politosphere, 2001), Politică şi geopolitică (Politics and Geopolitics, 2004), Dicţionar de geopolitică (Dictionary of Geopolitics, 2006), Despre geopolitică (About Geopolitics, 2009), Rusia la raspantie (Russia at the crossroads, 2014). Serebrian received the National Order „Star of Romania” with rank of Oficer in 2000 and the National Order of Merit of France in 2015.
E-mail: oserebrian@hotmail.com

SEVCENCO Ruslan
holds a Ph.D. from the Faculty of History, State University of Moldova. His dissertation has been published as Political Life in the Moldavian SSR, 1944-1961.
E-mail: rsevcenco@gmail.com

SLEZKINE Yuri
is Jane K. Sather Professor of History and Director of the Program in Eurasian and East European Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He graduated from Moscow State University in 1978 and received his PhD from the University of Texas at Austin in 1989. Professor Slezkine has written widely on Soviet History. In 2008, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His new book, The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution and Stalinist Reformation, 2016 is a history of the most famous residential building in the Soviet Union, built during the First Five-Year Plan as a model of the "Communist organization of daily life" and a shelter for top government officials, poets laureate, and Red Army commanders (on an island still known as "the Swamp"). His previous book, The Jewish Century (Princeton UP, 2004), won the National Jewish Book Award; the Annual book prize of the American Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies; and the Association of American Publishers Award for the Best Scholarly Book in Religion. Other important works: In the Shadow of Revolution: Life Stories of Russian Women from 1917 to the Second World War, edited by Sheila Fitzpatrick and Yuri Slezkine (Princeton: Princeton UP, 2000); Arctic Mirrors: Russia and the Small Peoples of the North (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994); "The USSR as a Communal Apartment, or How a Socialist State Promoted Ethnic Particularism," Slavic Review 53, no. 2 (Summer 1994): 414-452; Between Heaven and Hell: The Myth of Siberia in Russian Culture, ed. by Galya Diment and Yuri Slezkine (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1993).
E-mail: slezkine@berkeley.edu

STAMATI Iurie
defended his PhD at Laval University, Canada, which is about the place of Slavs in the Moldavian archaeological discourse during the Soviet era. His specific research interests are: the place of archaeology in the so-called "totalitarian" societies; archaeology and nationalism; the "field" of cultural production (especially the historiography and archaeology fields) in Soviet Union; the involvement of Pan-Slavic ideology in Moldavian and Romanian historiographic discourse.
E-mail: iuriestamati@yahoo.com

STAVILA Ion
is a Moldovan diplomat and university lecturer. He is a graduate of the Faculty of History of the Moldova State University (1976-1981) and of Moscow State University (1984-1987). He received his Ph.D. in French history at the Moscow State University in 1988. He has the diplomatic rank of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary. From 2016, he is Ambassador-at-large at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and European Integration of the Republic of Moldova. Ion Stavila was Senior lecturer and Deputy Dean of the Faculty of History and Ethno-Pedagogy at the Chisinau State Pedagogical Institute (1987-1991), as well at the Chair of Contemporary and Modern History Department of Moldova State University, (1991-1992). He started his diplomatic career in 1992. He served as Ambassador to several countries, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Moldova (2001-2004), Deputy Minister for Reintegration (2006-2009), and Head of the Bureau for Reintegration within the State Chancellery of the Republic of Moldova (2009-2010). Ion Stavila is the author of around 20 articles related to history, international relations and conflicts resolution.
E-mail: Ion.Stavila@mfa.md

SUSLOV Mikhail
is a visiting scholar at the Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Uppsala, Sweden and senior researcher at the Russian Institute for Cultural Research, Moscow. He received the PhD in History and Civilization (European University Institute, 2009) with the thesis „Russian Geopolitical Utopias in Comparative Perspective, 1880-1914” published in 2010 as a monograph and as a series of articles. His postdoctoral project examines Orthodox fundamentalism as an intellectual tradition in Eastern Europe.
E-mail: mikhail.suslov@eui.eu

SUVEICĂ Svetlana
has a Ph.D. in history and is a researcher at the Institute of History, University of Regensburg and an Associate professor at Moldova State University in Chișinău. Dr. Suveică is a former Humboldt research fellow at the Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS) Regensburg (2012-2014) and Fulbright research fellow at CREEES, Stanford University, California, USA (2009-2010). She authored two monographs and one edited volume, and numerous publications on the interwar political, administrative and social transformation of Romania and Bessarabia, social processes in Moldovan SSR, as well on recent political and social changes in the Republic of Moldova.
E-mail: ssuveica@gmail.com

TAKI Victor
holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the Central European University (Budapest). His doctoral dissertation, "Russia on the Danube: Imperial Expansion and Political Reform in Moldavia and Wallachia, 1812–1834," examined discursive and institutional aspects of relations between the Russian Empire and the elites of the two Romanian principalities at the dawn of the modern era. He has held temporary teaching positions at Carleton University (Ottawa), the University of Alberta (Edmonton), and Dalhousie University (Halifax). In 2011-2013, he was a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at the University of Alberta, working on a book project devoted to the Russian encounters with the Ottoman Empire in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He is currently affiliated with the Center of Ukrainian and Belorussian Studies at the Faculty of History of Moscow State University. His most recent publications are "Orientalism at the Margins: The Ottoman Empire under Russian Eyes," Kritika, no. 2 (2011), 321–351, and a monograph (co-authored with Andrei Cușco), Bessarabiia v sostave rossiiskoi imperii, 1812–1917 (Moscow: Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2012).
E-mail: vitaky2001@yahoo.com

VORONOVICI Alexandr
is a PhD candidate at the Central European University (Budapest) and lecturer at Ion Creangă Pedagogical State University of Chișinău. His research interests include Soviet nationality and borderland policies, entangled history of Central and Eastern Europe, history of the Soviet Union in comparative perspective. Currently Alexandr is writing the PhD thesis on the Soviet borderland policies in the Ukrainian SSR and the Moldovan ASSR in 1920s and 1930s. He is the author of several articles on interwar Soviet nationality policies. Research interests: Soviet nationality policies, borderland studies, history of entanglements.
E-mail: alex.voronovici@gmail.com

WILSON Andrew
is a Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations and Reader in Ukrainian Studies at University College London. He has worked extensively on the comparative politics of the post-Soviet states since 1990. His latest book Belarus: The Last European Dictatorship was published by Yale University Press in October 2011. His other recent books include The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation (Yale UP, third edition, 2009), Ukraine’s Orange Revolution (Yale UP, 2005) and Virtual Politics: Faking Democracy in the Post-Soviet World (Yale UP, 2005). His publications at ECFR include Dealing with Yanukovych’s Ukraine , The Limits of Enlargement-lite: EU and Russian Power in the Troubled Neighbourhood , Meeting Medvedev: The Politics of the Putin Succession and Can the EU Win the Peace in Georgia? (all available at www.ecfr.eu).
E-mail: andrew.wilson@ecfr.eu

ZICHNER Helga
is a research assistant at the Leibniz Institute for Regional Geography in Leipzig/Germany. She studied cultural sciences at the European University in Frankfurt (Oder), finishing faculty with a thesis on civil society issues in Romania. She started working at the Leibniz-Institute in 2008 in a project focusing on the impact of the new external borders of the EU on the daily lives of stakeholders in the affected border regions. Currently, she is working on a project that deals with the local effects of the policies the EU addresses to its direct neighbourhood, carrying out case studies in Moldova on different fields of the EU’s exterritorial policies. She is interested in questions of how big political approaches trickle down to the members of societies and in connected questions of embedding, effectiveness and social consequences of these processes.
E-mail: helga.zichner@web.de